the position of threat hunting

It couldn’t be more timely to see a couple blog posts on the topic of threat hunting, one from Robert M. Lee and another by Richard Bejtlich. (Updated to also add some Twitter comments links, as I think I agree with this position.) Reason? The past couple weeks I’ve been reading papers and other posts and job descriptions of “threat hunting,” as I try to figure out what that means and what it does in a security organization.

See, I’ve been part of the infosec community since around 2001 in some for or other. But around 2014-2015 or so, I fell a bit out of touch; I didn’t read much from twitter or other blogs and feeds of mine and didn’t really do any cons or other learning. As such, I turn around in 2016 and plug back in, and things like “kill chain” and “threat hunting” take me a bit by surprise at how suddenly they’ve popped up. And in the case of the latter term, I’ve been trying to figure out where it came from and what it really means. I mean, I like the idea of the task, but it doesn’t seem like a full time position to me; it seems like an amalgamation of other duties, or maybe just a way to save money on external pen/red team tests by getting internal offense members, and concocting some additional things for them to do so you don’t lose them to boredom.

(Side note, it’s an interesting time, where organizations want to do more than just strictly blue things, but it’s hard to make sure your offense-minded folks don’t get bored or jump for those flashy full-time pentesting gigs. Likewise, blue tools and signatures are reaching their limits of usefulness, but other techniques and detection and analysis require more effort, intelligence, and experience to wield for proper value; enter offensive minds.)

My confusion stems from hearing about the tasks, and not being sure if the hunter is looking for latent, active compromises in dark corners of the enterprise, or if they are testing for weak points in an organization’s posture and providing fixes. Or maybe they are like architects for new tools like UBA/UEBA as they attempt to emulate attackers and define how detection tools may help identify them better, especially when you have to rely on behavior and anomalies rather than hard signatures or IoCs (hey, there’s another surprise term that is new!). To me, security is not just about watching alerts in a SOC, but about constantly improving the position of the security functions. In a sense, I’m always looking for ways to have more complete visibility, or at least know where my blind spots may be. Role-playing and tabletop exercises help stimulate that thinking as well. Things like analyzing a new vulnerability announced and how to tell if that affects or has already affected me, or a new minor incident and what pieces of information are annoying to procure. Every blue question has a chance to improve the environment.

Also, is a threat hunter part of the blue team, part of the IR team, or part of an internal red team? Or maybe some combination of two or more of those areas; a sort of way to fill in some time between other tasks. Is it a way to get your SOC members something a little more mentally stimulating than watching alerts all day? Does it complement or replace role-playing exercises?

Anyway, I don’t have these answers yet, but these were timely articles on a topic I’ve been currently wrestling with.

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