using the new noscript addon with firefox 57 (quantum)

Recently, Mozilla has been pushing out its new Firefox 57 aka Quantum. The main reason I still use Firefox as my primary browser is the ability to turn off all scripting with full control using NoScript (IE can’t really, and Chrome I don’t trust fully with it’s built-in allows for Google). So it was extremely jarring when one of my systems updated to Quantum and removed my ability to use NoScript. Turns out, NoScript needed to be rewritten from scratch in order to work in new Firefox versions, which apparently was a rude surprise for even the author. Since then, he’s been working to get the new version stood up and functional.

When NoScript got started again as a WebExtension, it lacked any sort of temporary permissions control, which I use constantly. Soon, it got a global “temporary allow all” which is not something I would even touch. Now, however, we do have more granular control on temporary permissions. Unfortunately, the UI isn’t very clear on what’s happening.

My Use-Case: I browse the webs with Firefox+NoScript. When starting a fresh browser install, I install NoScript immediately and remove all the defaults so that I trust nothing at all. Then I browse what I normally browse. As pages don’t load or functionality isn’t working, I’ll examine what is blocked by NoScript. I then make a judgement call on whether to permanently trust (i.e. allow a script to execute on that page) or temporarily allow it, which means only as long as my browser process is active. Tomorrow, temporary permissions will disappear and I’ll start all over again. Clearly, websites I visit often will have a few permanent allows, but by and large, I leave everything blocked that doesn’t interfere with my ability to consume a web site.

So, let’s get back to the UI. How do I do what I was doing for many years in the new NoScript UI? (WARNING: The add-on is currently in active development, and these screenshots and steps may become obsolete in weeks or days. The version I’m referencing here is 10.1.5.5.)

Here’s what I see on ESPN.com:

And here’s a view after I change a few things:

So, what do I do with my typical use-case now? I browse to a site and see it’s not displaying properly. I click the NoScript addon icon (or ALT+Shift+N) to open the drop-down window with all sorts of scripts that want to execute. I click the blue “S” next to one I want to allow. This defaults to temporary allow, and whichever HTTP/HTTPS protocol it pertains to. If the site switches to HTTPS, I’ll need to do this again. If I see a bunch of subdomains under a domain that I trust, I’ll make my choice next to the entry that starts with a “…”. This latter situation is good to use with CDNs which can come from one of many subdomains.

Typically, I choose one script to allow, let the page reload, and keep repeating until I’m either satisfied with how the page looks/works, or I’ve exceeded my level of personal risk with the scripts I’m loading. Sometimes, I see 50 scripts that want to run and just decide the content is not worth wrestling with scripts to get it to work (often video embeds will be quite the hunt to get to work).

This sounds like I might be complaining about my cheese being moved. And partly I am. But, let’s face it, the change is needed and we’ll end up with even more granular control over script execution with this new NoScript version with features I’ve not even touched in this post. If anything, I’m annoyed with Mozilla for putting users like me in this situation where, for several weeks, I effectively was browsing the web with my pants down or not browsing it at all.

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